Stephen Hawking in Pop Culture of The Big Bang Theory, The Simpsons, Star Trek | BLOUIN ARTINFO
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Stephen Hawking in Pop Culture of The Big Bang Theory, The Simpsons, Star Trek

Stephen Hawking in Pop Culture of The Big Bang Theory, The Simpsons, Star Trek
Stephen Hawking made several appearances on “The Simpsons,” a show he called ‘the best thing on American television.’
(Photograph: Sherwin Crasto/AP)

Stephen Hawking, who passed away recently, was also a pop culture figure.

The Guardian quotes: “This Oscar belongs to all of those people around the world battling ALS. It belongs to one exceptional family,” said Eddie Redmayne in his Oscar acceptance speech in 2014 for his performance as Stephen Hawking in “The Theory of Everything.”

Hawking’s scientific curiosity shook up time and space and he took the world way ahead of its time despite his neuro-degenerative disease. Beyond science, his intimate sense of humor turned him to a pop culture icon. [Firstpost]

BBC’s feature-length drama adapted the story of Stephen Hawking in 2004 with Benedict Cumberbatch as the young Hawking. His story was also taken to the big screen with James Marsh’s 2014 film “The Theory of Everything.”

Hawking has been a pop culture icon as well. Hawking voiced himself in “The Simpsons” three times and his several appearances earned him an official plastic figurine. The theoretical physicist also played himself in “The Big Bang Theory,” the popular sitcom by Chuck Lorre. Hawking’s made a cameo in the 1993 “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” playing poker with Einstein and Newton. [Euronews]

He was referenced in a number of geek-friendly TV shows: “Doctor Who,” “Dexter's Laboratory,” “Pinky and the Brain” and “The IT Crowd.” Hawking once joked that he won’t be “a true pop culture icon” until he appears on “Keeping Up with the Kardashians.” [Firstpost]

Beyond films and TV, his voice was also featured in Pink Floyd’s 1994 track “Keep Talking.”

His exploration of time transcended his comic timings, at times. He was extraordinarily funny and popular culture did cultivate that. Like once Hawking said, “life would be tragic if it weren't funny.”[Euronews]