‘Objectifying China: Ming and Qing Dynasty Ceramics and Their Stylistic Influences Abroad’ at UMAG, Hong Kong | BLOUIN ARTINFO
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‘Objectifying China: Ming and Qing Dynasty Ceramics and Their Stylistic Influences Abroad’ at UMAG, Hong Kong

‘Objectifying China: Ming and Qing Dynasty Ceramics and Their Stylistic Influences Abroad’ at UMAG, Hong Kong
A Tang dynasty water pot from the 9th century with distinctive blue-and-white decoration.
(Courtesy: University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong)

The University Museum and Art Gallery (UMAG) of the University of Hong Kong is hosting an exhibition titled “Objectifying China: Ming and Qing Dynasty Ceramics and Their Stylistic Influences Abroad” that underscores the flow of ideas about Chinese porcelain between East and West along the maritime Silk Road. 

The exhibition highlights lesser known aspects of the history of ceramics, such as the first appearance of Chinese blue-and-whites during the Tang dynasty. Acquired by the museum in 1953, one of the exhibits is a 9th century water pot just over 7 centimeters tall, decorated in blue cobalt imported from the Abbasid empire. One of the earliest copies of Chinese ceramic ware in the show comes from Korea, where local kilns during the Goryeo dynasty (918-1392) replicated the celadon (greenware) pottery imported from China. The exhibition also displays a porcelain Virgin and Child that is similar to figures collected by Augustus II the Strong of Poland and William III of England, alongside pieces on loan from Singapore’s Asian Civilisations Museum and the Hong Kong Maritime Museum. Chinese craftsmen molded new shapes and adapted Western motifs to satisfy their Western customers, including Italian aristocrats and the Dutch.

“Objectifying China: Ming and Qing Dynasty Ceramics and Their Stylistic Influences Abroad” is on view through February 27, 2018, at the University Museum and Art Gallery of the University of Hong Kong, 90 Bonham Rd, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong, noted the South China Morning Post